Leadership in today’s NHS: delivering the impossible

The King’s Fund & NHS Providers | July 2018 | Leadership in today’s NHS: delivering the impossible

The King’s Fund & NHS Providers report the findings from their  survey of NHS trusts and foundation trusts conducted in 2017 by NHS Providers, the survey used qualitative interviews and a roundtable event with frontline leaders and national stakeholders.

 

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Image source: kingsfund.org.uk

Among the findings from the survey:

  • Leadership vacancies are widespread, with director of operations, finance and strategy roles having particularly high vacancy rates and short tenures
  • A culture of blaming individuals for failure is making leadership roles less attractive. Organisations with the most significant performance challenges experience higher levels of leadership churn. National bodies need to do more to support leaders to take on and stay in these roles.
  • To tackle high leadership churn, national programmes should target professional roles  where concerns over the pipeline of future leaders is greatest. Regional talent
    management functions – largely absent since the abolition of strategic health authorities – should be rebuilt in the new joint NHS England and NHS Improvement regional teams (Source: The King’s Fund & NHS Providers).

The news release from  The King’s Fund  can be viewed here

The summary is available here 

The report can be read from The King’s Fund 
Related:

NHS Providers NHS trusts face worryingly high levels of senior vacancies

NHS Providers & The Kin’gs Fund Infographic 

 

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Taking the value-based agenda forward: The five essential components of value-based approaches to health and care

NHS Confederation | July 2018 | Taking the value-based agenda forward: The five essential components of value-based approaches to health and care

A new paper from NHS Confederation explores the central challenge of how to take value-based healthcare to the next stage and embed it across the whole system.

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It explores five key characteristics/factors which we believe can support the wholesale adoption of value-based healthcare approaches. These are:

  • Learning and adapting through the adoption of innovation
  • Managing risk
  • Making best use of data
  • Thinking about pathways across the whole system
  • Listening to patients.
    (NHS Confederation

The full paper can be read at NHS England 

Supporting line managers to foster engagement

NHS Employers | July 2018 | Supporting line managers to foster engagement

IES has produced a short briefing on behalf of NHS Employers. The 
briefing explores work that can be done to support and develop line managers to improve staff engagement across NHS organisations. 

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The briefing is based on the issues raised by line managers within the NHS and looks at challenges for staff engagement. It outlines suggestions on how organisations can support line managers to manage in way that supports engagement, and is full of useful advice, hints and tips (Source: NHS Employers).

The briefing is available from NHS Employers 

 

Preparing the healthcare workforce to deliver the digital future

Health Education England | June 2018 | The Topol Review Preparing the healthcare workforce to deliver the digital future

Health Education England (HEE) has published its interim report on preparing the healthcare workforce for future developments. The review is considering four key questions:

  1.  How are technological (genomics, digital medicine, artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics) and other developments likely to change the roles and functions
    of clinical staff and their support in all professions over the next two decades?
  2. What are the implications of these changes for the skills required?
  3. For which professions or sub-specialisms are these likely to be particularly significant?
  4.  What does this mean for the selection, curricula, education, training, development and lifelong learning of current and future NHS staff?
Preparing the healthcare workforce
Image source: .hee.nhs.uk

Based on its work so far, HEE’s Review is proposing three key principles, which should govern the NHS’s future workforce strategy, these are: 
• Patients: If willing and able to do so, will be empowered by new tools to become more actively involved and engaged in their care. The patient generated data will be interpreted by algorithms enabling personalised self-management and self-care.
• Evidence: The introduction of any technology must be grounded in robust research evidence and a fit for purpose and ethical governance framework that patients, public and staff can all trust.
• Gift of time: Whenever possible, the adoption of technology should be used to give more time for care, creating an environment in which the patient-clinician relationship is enhanced.

The Interim Report June 2018- A Call for Evidence is at HEE 

Recovering NHS performance risks swallowing up new funding

NHS Providers | July 2018 | Recovering NHS performance risks swallowing up new funding

A report by NHS Providers warns that filling the gaps that have opened up in the health service after almost a decade of austerity will account for much if not most of the new money recently announced by the prime minister.

The report  The NHS funding settlement: recovering lost ground informs the debate on how the additional money should be spent to deliver the best deal for patients and service users, and for the taxpayer.
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The report offers a realistic assessment of the likely costs of restoring performance in the hospital, mental health, community and ambulance sectors, so the health service can sustainably deliver the standards of care the public rightly expects, as outlined in the NHS constitution (Source:NHS Providers).

A news release is available here 

The report can be read at NHS Providers 

Achieving the Provision of Integrated Care

This report traces the development and impact of integrated care to date, highlights some examples of successful practice and draws out the key lessons for later-adopters |  National Association of Primary Care

This report suggests that a number of of factors – ageing populations, an increased prevalence of multiple chronic disease and rising expectations of what health care and technology can offer –  combined with limited human and financial resources, have placed health  systems under intolerable and unsustainable strain.

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Image source: http://napc.co.uk

Integrated Care Systems, where health providers collaborate with other community  stakeholders to prevent ill health, provide more comprehensive care closer to home, keep people out of hospital and reduce costs, is seen as the antidote to these problems. This approach is now spreading around the world, taking many different forms from country to country.

This report of a two-day symposium attended by health experts from the UK, USA and Ireland, traces the development and impact of integrated care to date, highlights some examples of successful practice and draws out the key lessons for later-adopters.

Full report:

Achieving the Provision of Integrated Care:  Exploring the development and successful
implementation internationally of new models of integrated care

How fixing the NHS’s broken pay system can deliver better outcomes for patients

An NHS bonus: how fixing the NHS’s broken pay system can deliver better outcomes for patients | Centre for Policy Studies

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Image source: http://www.cps.org.uk

This report argues that by introducing greater flexibility into the system, and linking pay more closely with performance and objectives, both NHS productivity and patient outcomes could be improved. It urges the Government, and NHS managers, to make reform of the pay system an urgent priority as part of the new funding settlement.

Full report available here