The effects of mindfulness-based interventions for health and social care undergraduate students

Health and social care undergraduate students experience stress due to high workloads and pressure to perform | Psychology, Health & Medicine

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Consequences include depression and burnout. Mindfulness may be a suitable way to reduce stress in health and social care degree courses. The objective of this systematic review is to identify and critically appraise the literature on the effects of Mindfulness-Based Interventions for health and social care undergraduate students.

PubMed, EMBASE, Psych Info, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library and Academic Search Complete were searched from inception to 21st November 2016. Studies that delivered Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, or an intervention modelled closely on these, to health or social care undergraduate students were included. Eleven studies, representing medicine, nursing and psychology students met the inclusion criteria. The most commonly used measurement tools were; the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and the General Health Questionnaire.

Short term benefits relating to stress and mood were reported, despite all but one study condensing the curriculum. Gender and personality emerged as factors likely to affect intervention results. Further research with long-term follow-up is required to definitively conclude that mindfulness is an appropriate intervention to mentally prepare health and social care undergraduate students for their future careers.

Full reference: O’Driscoll, M. et al. (2017) The effects of mindfulness-based interventions for health and social care undergraduate students – a systematic review of the literature. Psychology, Health & Medicine. Vol. 22 (Issue 7) pp. 851-865

General Data Protection Regulation – will you be ready?

From 25 May 2018, all health organisations and arm’s-length bodies will need to demonstrate compliance with new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) requirements. GDPR will replace the Data Protection Directive (1995) | NHS Employers

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Employers are encouraged to plan ahead for the operational changes and consider how they will raise awareness of the new requirements and evidence they meet them. This will include:

  • Planning and resourcing the appointment of a data protection officer whose job description is compliant with GDPR requirements.
  • Revising information governance and related policies, addressing accountability, data protection officer reporting arrangements and statutory reporting requirements.
  • Creating an action/project plan which includes a set of measures to meet the requirements, ideally endorsed by the board.

Read the full overview here

Networked care – a toolkit for practice

Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust is one of the 13 acute care vanguards which aim to “link hospitals together to improve their clinical and financial viability, reducing variation in care and efficiency” | Institute of Healthcare Management

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The Moorfields vanguard team has spent the past year exploring whether the longer-term sustainability of single speciality services can be strengthened by entering into a networked care partnership, and the other benefits that the model might bring.

The team was keen to understand what makes the biggest difference for patients, staff and partner organisations in getting things right first time when establishing a networked care partnership; and to identify the best way to sustain services so that specialist care can continue to be offered locally.

The team’s findings are shared in the toolkit, an online resource with evidenced-based learning that other trusts can use to evaluate whether networked care could help their smaller clinical services.  It has practical advice on how organisations can establish their own network in the way for them.

The toolkit also includes recommendations on how to:

  • ensure consistent quality of care at multiple sites
  • ensure a sustainable workforce
  • maintain effective partnerships
  • develop sustainable specialist care
  • provide a standardised quality of care

Impact of inadequate health literacy on patient satisfaction, healthcare utilization, and expenditures

Inadequate health literacy (HL) is associated with impaired healthcare choices leading to poor quality-of-care | Geriatric Nursing

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Our primary purpose was to estimate the prevalence of inadequate HL among two populations of AARP®Medicare Supplement insureds: sicker and healthier populations; to identify characteristics of inadequate HL; and to describe the impact on patient satisfaction, preventive services, healthcare utilization, and expenditures. Surveys were mailed to insureds in 10 states. Multivariate regression models were used to identify characteristics and adjust outcomes. Among respondents (N = 7334), 23% and 16% of sicker and healthier insureds, respectively, indicated inadequate HL. Characteristics of inadequate HL included male gender, older age, more comorbidities, and lower education. Inadequate HL was associated with lower patient satisfaction, lower preventive service compliance, higher healthcare utilization and expenditures. Inadequate HL is more common among older adults in poorer health, further compromising their health outcomes; thus they may benefit from expanded educational or additional care coordination interventions.

Full reference: MacLeod, S. et al. (2017) The impact of inadequate health literacy on patient satisfaction, healthcare utilization, and expenditures among older adults. Geriatric Nursing. Volume 38 (Issue 4) pp. 334–341

A journey to improved staff engagement – in our shoes

NHS Employers, August 2017

Imperial-college

Source: NHS Employers

 

This case study looks at how Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust has significantly improved their staff engagement levels using new and innovative methods. Through engaging with staff to understand more about how they are feeling at work, engagement levels have improved from the 2015 score of 3.71 to 3.8 in 2016, which was the largest year-on-year increase of all acute trusts in London.

 

 

Encouraging speaking up through trust wide engagement

NHS Employers

York-Speaking-up

Source: NHS Employers

This shared learning example describes how Lisa Smith, Freedom to Speak Up guardian in York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has engaged with multiple sites to help foster a positive, safe culture of speaking up.

With one of the largest NHS geographies in the UK, find out more about the methods being used by Lisa at York to promote awareness of raising concerns, including attending flu clinics to reach out to as many staff as possib