Cyber security boost to the NHS as NHS Digital joins forces with IBM

NHS Digital has entered into a three-year strategic partnership with IBM to provide a range of new and improved services to health and care organisations. These services will enhance data security and cyber security response and provide additional defence against increasingly complex, evolving threats.

The additional services will expand NHS Digital’s existing Cyber Security Operations Centre (CSOC) and enhance NHS Digital’s current capability to monitor, detect and respond to a variety of security risks and threats across the NHS, and offer expert advice and guidance

The CSOC expands on the existing cyber security services provided by NHS Digital and will include:

  • Enhanced services, such as vulnerability scanning and malware analysis, allowing NHS Digital to offer tailored and specialist advice to individual NHS organisations
  • Enhancement of NHS Digitals current monitoring capability enabling the analyses of data from multiple sources to detect threats across NHS Digital’s national systems and services
  • Access to IBM’s X-Force repository of threat intelligence to provide insight, guidance, and advice so health and care organisations can take appropriate action to prepare for, or mitigate against, identified risks and threats.
  • Security monitoring pilots across selected NHS organisations, to test a range of security technologies and identify appropriate solutions that could be rolled out across the NHS estate
  • An innovation service which will allow NHS Digital to quickly access new tools technologies and expertise to address new threats as they emerge and to allow it to adapt services to meet the changing needs of the health and care sector.

Full story at NHS Digital

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Looking ahead: the NHS at 100

Looking ahead: the NHS at 100 | Healthcare Financial Management Association

looking
Image source: http://www.hfma.org.uk

The challenges facing the NHS are significant. Waiting lists are increasing, A&E attendances are rising and access to GP
appointments can be difficult. Alongside this is a growing population who are living longer and developing more complex conditions, which increases demand on an
already overstretched service.

This report explores the key challenges the HFMA think will have the biggest impact on the financial future of health and social care.  It highlights the likely direction of travel and provides insight to help inform current decision-making.

Full report: Looking ahead: the NHS at 100

 

Ten steps towards a new plan for the NHS in England

Ten steps towards a new plan for the NHS in England | NHS Confederation

The Confederation is calling for a national conversation about what we want and can expect from the health service in England over the next ten years.   It proposes ten actions which would underpin specific priorities for a new plan.

Full document: Ten steps towards a new plan for the NHS in England

ten steps
Image source: http://www.nhsconfed.org

The health and social care interface

The health and social care interface | National Audit Office

There is widespread consensus among health and social care professionals, the NHS and policy-makers in government that the changing needs of the population require changes to the way health and social care services are organised and delivered.

This ‘think piece’ highlights the barriers that prevent health and social care services working together effectively, examples of joint working in a ‘whole system’ sense and the move towards services centred on the needs of the individual. The report aims to inform the ongoing debate about the future of health and social care in England. It anticipates the upcoming green paper on the future funding of adult social care, and the planned 2019 Spending Review, which will set out the funding needs of both local government and the NHS.

The report presents and discusses 16 challenges to improved joint working. It also highlights some of the work being carried out nationally and locally to overcome these challenges and the progress that has been made.

Report – The health and social care interface

Press release – The health and social care interface

Developing new care models through NHS vanguards

The vanguard programme, one of NHS England’s attempts to better meet patients’ needs and deliver savings by developing new care models to integrate health and social care services, has not delivered the depth and scale of transformed services it aimed for at the beginning of the programme, according to this report by the National Audit Office.

A key objective of the programme was to design new care models that could be quickly replicated across England. NHS England selected 50 sites to act as ‘vanguards’ which might entail, for example, joining up GP, hospital and community and mental health services in an integrated network or single organisation in one area to improve healthcare for patients.

NHS England’s early planning assumption was £2.2 billion of funding for new care models between 2016-17 and 2020-21, but it used much of the funding to reduce deficits faced by hospitals. Actual direct funding of vanguards was £329 million over three years from 2015-16, with another £60 million spent by NHS England on central support for vanguards. Consequently, with less funding for transformation, the original intention to expand the programme was not realised.

Despite not meeting its original intention to expand the models across the country, vanguards have made progress in developing new care models. NHS England forecasts that vanguards will make net savings. As at April 2018, it estimated that vanguards would secure £324 million net savings annually by 2020-21, which is 90% of the £360 million that had been expected.

Full report:  Developing new care models through NHS vanguards

See also: National Audit Office press release

Long-term funding of adult social care

The Housing, Communities and Local Government and Health and Social Care Committees have published Long-term funding of adult social care.

The joint report calls for a sustainable funding solution for adult social care and the introduction of a ‘Social Care Premium’, either as an additional element of National Insurance or with the premium paid into dedicated not-for-profit social insurance fund that people would be confident could only be used for social care.

Watch the interactive report:

social care
Image source: social.shorthand.com

 

Innovation in Medicine 2018: Government must double number of medical students

Royal College of Physicians | June 2018 | Innovation in Medicine 2018: Government must double number of medical students

A new policy briefing, Double or quits: calculating how many more medical students we need , from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP)  outlines new calculations for the number of doctors needed, and sets out the key issues facing workforce planning in the UK that affect current supply, future service demand and predicted losses in the workforce. The RCP  has called on the government to double the number of medical school places from 7,500 to 15,000 to meet the needs of tomorrow’s patients (Source: RCP). 

Double or nothing
Image source: rcplondon.ac.uk

The briefing paper is available to read here 
The new release is accessible from RCP