Driving improvement: case studies from eight NHS trusts

Reviewing the culture of NHS trusts and addressing disconnects between clinicians and managers within the organisation is key to improving care, a new CQC report has revealed. | Care Quality Commission | via National Health Executive

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The CQC has published ‘Driving improvement: case studies from eight NHS trusts’.

The document examines how a number of different trusts improved care and subsequently their CQC rating by making simple changes to how services were run.

During its study, the inspectorate found that engaging with staff and allowing for open and honest conversations was vital to making improvements to care delivery.

The CQC also discovered that successful trusts tended to make their chief executives and senior staff more visible by having them spend more time on the ‘shop floor’ – meeting staff and setting up regular channels of communication. The report also highlights the increasing challenges faced by trusts.

Read more at National Health Executive

Full report: ‘Driving improvement: case studies from eight NHS trusts’.

Compassionate leadership in health care

Caring to change:  How compassionate leadership can stimulate innovation in health care | Kings Fund

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This paper looks at compassion as a core cultural value of the NHS and how compassionate leadership results in a working environment that encourages people to find new and improved ways of doing things.  It describes four key elements of a culture for innovative, high-quality and continually improving care and what they mean for patients, staff and the wider organisation: inspiring vision and strategy; positive inclusion and participation; enthusiastic team and cross-boundary working; and support and autonomy for staff to innovate. It also presents case studies of how compassionate leadership has led to innovation. This work was supported by the Health Foundation.

Download the full report here

Related Kings Fund blog: Compassionate leadership – more important than ever in today’s NHS

Managing from within the team

Most managers are members of the team they manage. This creates tension between the need to complete your own work and the need to manage the rest of the team | PCC

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This course helps managers to balance these two roles, manage their team’s workload and delegate effectively. It takes you through how to successfully communicate at different levels within your organisation as well as how to avoid or manage conflict within your team.

Managing from Within the Team enables you to:

  • Get the balance right between doing and managing
  • Manage time well and delegate effectively
  • Be conscious of responsibility as role model to the team and what it involves
  • See how behaviour can shape the behaviour of others
  • Know when and how to offer help to team members
  • Provide help to team members without taking over

Read the full overview here

Building knowledge and skills in public mental health

Fenton, K. & Arora, S. Public Health Matters Blog. Published online: 10 October 2016

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Providing the right training and building the capacity of the workforce to promote mental health and wellbeing and prevent mental illness is essential if we are to reduce health inequalities and increase skills in enabling people to recognise and manage their health and wellbeing.

Good mental health underpins health and wellbeing and also our ability to change unhealthy behaviours or manage long-term conditions.

Mental illness is also associated with many physical health conditions and, as reported in the recent Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, one adult in six has anxiety or depression.

It is essential, therefore, that our entire workforce is trained in mental health.

Read the full blog post here

Improving Health Care Through Better Conversation

Coalition for Collaborative Care| Published online: 19 September 2016

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Image source: HEE

Research shows that people often don’t take their medications or change their lifestyles after after visiting a doctor or a nurse, while only about 60 per cent of people feel they are sufficiently involved in decisions about their care.

A campaign is being launched to tackle this issue and improve the way in which health professionals and people talk.

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Image source: HEE

‘Better Conversations’ looks at how clinicians and commissioners can introduce health coaching and will provide  information, evidence and tips on how to have a more equal conversation with people and are treated as partners in their care, rather than passive recipients.

It has been described by NHS Medical Director Professor Sir Bruce Keogh as an essential part of the plan to transform the way health care services are provided, to make them sustainable.

A pilot programme of health coaching was rolled out to nearly 800 clinicians across the East of England and is now ready for national adoption. The work is driven by Dr Penny Newman and backed by the NHS Innovation Accelerator initiative to achieve the aims of NHS England’s Five Year Forward View.

View the summary here

View HEE resources here