Improving the management of digital government

Improving the management of digital government argues that the digitisation of public services in the UK is happening too slowly | Institute for Government

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It says that appointing a minister responsible for digital government would help drive change and advance standards. Digital improvements would make government cheaper, more effective and more secure. The report points to the recent NHS cyberattack as an example of the fragility in some systems being used in the public sector.

The report warns that the Government Digital Service (GDS), the Cabinet Office unit responsible for leading digital transformation of government, faces resistance from many corners of Whitehall. Without a strong minister in charge, GDS is not able to drive digital improvements in a way that meets citizens’ expectations. It sets standards for digital government, but these need to be improved and extended throughout the civil service, and with IT contractors.

The report also makes several recommendations for both GDS and Whitehall departments on how they can work better together. The Government needs to organise services around people’s needs and to urgently clarify which system citizens should use to securely identify themselves online.

 

Learning from technological innovation in the vanguards

Helen Arthur, Harnessing Technology Lead, New Care Models Programme at NHS England, talks about how the vanguards are applying technology, and how other areas can learn from their challenges and successes. | via The Kings Fund

Related event: Digital Health and Care Congress 2017: Embedding technology in health and social care

Related publication: A digital NHS? An introduction to the digital agenda and plans for implementation

 

Feasibility and Utility of Online Dementia Care Training for Hospital Staff

Hobday, J.H. et al. (2017) Research in Gerontological Nursing (10)2 pp. 58-65

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The current project tested the feasibility and utility of the CARES® Dementia-Friendly Hospital™ (CDFH) program, a 4-module, online training program for nursing assistants (NAs) and allied hospital workers (AHWs) who provide care to individuals with dementia.

A single group pretest/posttest design was used for 25 hospital NAs/AHWs, and quantitative and qualitative data were collected to determine whether NAs’/AHWs’ knowledge of hospital-based dementia care significantly increased, and if CDFH was perceived as useful and acceptable.

Dementia care knowledge increased significantly (p < 0.001). Open- and closed-ended data suggested that the delivery of online training to NAs/AHWs to enhance dementia care is feasible, useful, and efficient.

Ongoing gaps in care exist for individuals with dementia in hospitals, and delivering robust training for NAs/AHWs may serve as an effective modality to enhance quality of dementia care in such settings.

Read the full article here

Information and Digital Technologies: Clinical Requirements 2020

Breakthroughs in the use of data and technology are changing the way we live our lives. Adaptation of these changes has been relatively slow in healthcare, but there is now an increasing focus on learning how to use these technologies to improve the way we deliver care for our patients | Academy of Royal Medical Colleges

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Image source: AoMRC

Policy developments in the digital agenda at a national level have been supported by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges setting out its vision for NHS information systems in 2013 and the National Information strategy for a digital NHS in 2014.

The aim of this document is to ensure that clinical priorities are met and reflected at a national level. It is the list of clinical requirements setting out what information and communication technologies clinicians would expect in 2020 in the work environment. These standards have been designed to establish a level of detail that will inform decision-making and enable accountability.

As 2020 approaches Clinicians should see the tangible areas of improvement in data and technology and use it to modernise and improve the quality of care we are able to deliver for our patients.

Read the full report here

Productivity, Technology and the NHS

Productivity, Technology and the NHS, looks at the NHS in England approach to productivity improvement half-way through the implementation of NHS Engand’s ‘Five Year Forward View | Newchurch

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Image source: Newchurch

A core component of NHS England’s Five Year Forward View (5YFV), which underpinned the subsequent financial settlement agreed with the Government, was that NHS productivity would improve by 2.4% a year for each of the five years up to 2020/21. The 5YFV went further suggesting that its implementation could even result in sustained improvements of 3% a year in the longer term, a proposition which must have assumed sustained improvement in workforce productivity, given that staff costs make up some 70% of NHS expenditure. This proposition always looked ambitious and subsequent analyses of the NHS’s long-term productivity performance have served to underline the size of the challenge. However the Carter Review, published 12 months ago, underlined the scale of the potential improvements that could be made in the NHS’s dominant acute sector.

A key contributor to achieving the rate of productivity improvement underpinning the 5FYV, reinforced by Carter’s conclusions, was the adoption of new digital technologies. This faith in the impact of digital technology is despite the evidence of the last 20 years that would cast considerable doubt as to the productivity impact of the digital technologies programmes that the NHS in England and its predecessors have implemented.

An analysis of current performance and future plans at the national, Sustainability and Transformation Plan and trust level suggests that the NHS as a system gives little priority to productivity improvement. Furthermore current plans for the development and implementation of digital technologies are unlikely to have any significant impact on productivity, certainly within the lifetime of the 5YFV.

Read the full overview here

Read the full report here

New healthcare social media toolkit – helping you connect

Social media is a powerful tool: helping organisations and its people to raise awareness, share information, engage with existing audiences and reach out to new ones | Skills for Health

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Image source: Skills for Health

To help you make the most of the opportunities social media can provide, we have launched a comprehensive social media toolkit packed full of sector-specific insight, advice and best practice on how to use social media effectively.

Whether you are completely new to social media or want to make sure your existing social presence is fit for purpose and operates at its full potential, the toolkit will instruct and educate your organisation and employees on how to use these platforms effectively and efficiently.

Read the full overview here

The full toolkit if available here