‘Data revolution’ crucial to transformation

A ‘data revolution’ across health and care services in England is vital if local areas are to transform the way care is delivered | NHS Confederation

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The NHS Confederation has launched a new series of guides to help board members to better understand data across the healthcare system and its role in transforming care.

Produced in association with healthcare intelligence provider CHKS, the guides for non-executive directors (NEDs) aim to kick start a ‘data revolution’ by looking at how data can be used to drive improvement, provide effective oversight and support the transformation of care. The first guide is aimed at NEDs in acute care, and examines activity in both primary and secondary care settings and considers the role of data sharing in bringing about efficiency savings.

Full document: The non-executive director’s guide to NHS data. Part one: Hospital activity, data sets and performance

 

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New care models: harnessing technology

New care models: harnessing technology | NHS Confederation

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This report explores how five vanguards are implementing innovative digital technology solutions. It suggests that the starting point for the introduction of any new technology should always be from the perspective of the end user and that end-users should always be involved in the co-production of technological solutions.

Full report: New care models: harnessing technology

Additional link: NHS Confederation press release

Digital literacy important for delivering better & safer care

Our TEL Programme is excited to be working in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) on some of our digital literacy work | HEE

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Image source: HEE

The RCN has endorsed our work to date and are working with us on promoting the widest use across the health and care landscape of our definition of digital literacy and the digital capabilities that sit within that definition. Our latest document‘Improving digital literacy’, published today, explains what digital literacy is and why it is important.

Ian Cumming, our Chief Executive, and Janet Davies, RCN’s Chief Executive and General Secretary, have written the foreword for the joint document which outlines:

  • Why digital capabilities are so important in the provision of the best care
  • Why the right digital knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes are important and relevant to each and all of us working in health and care
  • What those digital capabilities are
  • Work undertaken to date on the digital literacy programme of work.

The document also highlights the RCN’s focus on developing digital capabilities in the nursing and midwifery workforce and why this will bring tangible benefits to citizens and patients.

Improving the management of digital government

Improving the management of digital government argues that the digitisation of public services in the UK is happening too slowly | Institute for Government

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It says that appointing a minister responsible for digital government would help drive change and advance standards. Digital improvements would make government cheaper, more effective and more secure. The report points to the recent NHS cyberattack as an example of the fragility in some systems being used in the public sector.

The report warns that the Government Digital Service (GDS), the Cabinet Office unit responsible for leading digital transformation of government, faces resistance from many corners of Whitehall. Without a strong minister in charge, GDS is not able to drive digital improvements in a way that meets citizens’ expectations. It sets standards for digital government, but these need to be improved and extended throughout the civil service, and with IT contractors.

The report also makes several recommendations for both GDS and Whitehall departments on how they can work better together. The Government needs to organise services around people’s needs and to urgently clarify which system citizens should use to securely identify themselves online.

 

Learning from technological innovation in the vanguards

Helen Arthur, Harnessing Technology Lead, New Care Models Programme at NHS England, talks about how the vanguards are applying technology, and how other areas can learn from their challenges and successes. | via The Kings Fund

Related event: Digital Health and Care Congress 2017: Embedding technology in health and social care

Related publication: A digital NHS? An introduction to the digital agenda and plans for implementation

 

Feasibility and Utility of Online Dementia Care Training for Hospital Staff

Hobday, J.H. et al. (2017) Research in Gerontological Nursing (10)2 pp. 58-65

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The current project tested the feasibility and utility of the CARES® Dementia-Friendly Hospital™ (CDFH) program, a 4-module, online training program for nursing assistants (NAs) and allied hospital workers (AHWs) who provide care to individuals with dementia.

A single group pretest/posttest design was used for 25 hospital NAs/AHWs, and quantitative and qualitative data were collected to determine whether NAs’/AHWs’ knowledge of hospital-based dementia care significantly increased, and if CDFH was perceived as useful and acceptable.

Dementia care knowledge increased significantly (p < 0.001). Open- and closed-ended data suggested that the delivery of online training to NAs/AHWs to enhance dementia care is feasible, useful, and efficient.

Ongoing gaps in care exist for individuals with dementia in hospitals, and delivering robust training for NAs/AHWs may serve as an effective modality to enhance quality of dementia care in such settings.

Read the full article here