Preparing the healthcare workforce to deliver the digital future

Health Education England | June 2018 | The Topol Review Preparing the healthcare workforce to deliver the digital future

Health Education England (HEE) has published its interim report on preparing the healthcare workforce for future developments. The review is considering four key questions:

  1.  How are technological (genomics, digital medicine, artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics) and other developments likely to change the roles and functions
    of clinical staff and their support in all professions over the next two decades?
  2. What are the implications of these changes for the skills required?
  3. For which professions or sub-specialisms are these likely to be particularly significant?
  4.  What does this mean for the selection, curricula, education, training, development and lifelong learning of current and future NHS staff?
Preparing the healthcare workforce
Image source: .hee.nhs.uk

Based on its work so far, HEE’s Review is proposing three key principles, which should govern the NHS’s future workforce strategy, these are: 
• Patients: If willing and able to do so, will be empowered by new tools to become more actively involved and engaged in their care. The patient generated data will be interpreted by algorithms enabling personalised self-management and self-care.
• Evidence: The introduction of any technology must be grounded in robust research evidence and a fit for purpose and ethical governance framework that patients, public and staff can all trust.
• Gift of time: Whenever possible, the adoption of technology should be used to give more time for care, creating an environment in which the patient-clinician relationship is enhanced.

The Interim Report June 2018- A Call for Evidence is at HEE 

Advertisements

Cyber security boost to the NHS as NHS Digital joins forces with IBM

NHS Digital has entered into a three-year strategic partnership with IBM to provide a range of new and improved services to health and care organisations. These services will enhance data security and cyber security response and provide additional defence against increasingly complex, evolving threats.

The additional services will expand NHS Digital’s existing Cyber Security Operations Centre (CSOC) and enhance NHS Digital’s current capability to monitor, detect and respond to a variety of security risks and threats across the NHS, and offer expert advice and guidance

The CSOC expands on the existing cyber security services provided by NHS Digital and will include:

  • Enhanced services, such as vulnerability scanning and malware analysis, allowing NHS Digital to offer tailored and specialist advice to individual NHS organisations
  • Enhancement of NHS Digitals current monitoring capability enabling the analyses of data from multiple sources to detect threats across NHS Digital’s national systems and services
  • Access to IBM’s X-Force repository of threat intelligence to provide insight, guidance, and advice so health and care organisations can take appropriate action to prepare for, or mitigate against, identified risks and threats.
  • Security monitoring pilots across selected NHS organisations, to test a range of security technologies and identify appropriate solutions that could be rolled out across the NHS estate
  • An innovation service which will allow NHS Digital to quickly access new tools technologies and expertise to address new threats as they emerge and to allow it to adapt services to meet the changing needs of the health and care sector.

Full story at NHS Digital

How do you engage clinicians in your digital change programme?

The King’s Fund | June 2018 | How do you engage clinicians in your digital change programme?

In a new guest post on The King’s Fund blog, Dr Robert Fearn, a clinician from Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust,  explores the important relationship between technology and user engagement.

change-948024_1920

For Fearn, “Digital transformation projects are as complex as the health care systems they are being implemented within. There is plenty that can go wrong, and as clinicians we are often too ready to oppose change, rather than play our role in making it work.”

The full blog post can be read at The King’s Fund 

The King’s Fund report  Digital change in health and social care, will be published later this month.

‘Data revolution’ crucial to transformation

A ‘data revolution’ across health and care services in England is vital if local areas are to transform the way care is delivered | NHS Confederation

ball-63527_1920 (1)

The NHS Confederation has launched a new series of guides to help board members to better understand data across the healthcare system and its role in transforming care.

Produced in association with healthcare intelligence provider CHKS, the guides for non-executive directors (NEDs) aim to kick start a ‘data revolution’ by looking at how data can be used to drive improvement, provide effective oversight and support the transformation of care. The first guide is aimed at NEDs in acute care, and examines activity in both primary and secondary care settings and considers the role of data sharing in bringing about efficiency savings.

Full document: The non-executive director’s guide to NHS data. Part one: Hospital activity, data sets and performance

 

New care models: harnessing technology

New care models: harnessing technology | NHS Confederation

pattern-2365578_1920.jpg

This report explores how five vanguards are implementing innovative digital technology solutions. It suggests that the starting point for the introduction of any new technology should always be from the perspective of the end user and that end-users should always be involved in the co-production of technological solutions.

Full report: New care models: harnessing technology

Additional link: NHS Confederation press release

Digital literacy important for delivering better & safer care

Our TEL Programme is excited to be working in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) on some of our digital literacy work | HEE

314620-hee20rcn20report201620pages20final_page_1
Image source: HEE

The RCN has endorsed our work to date and are working with us on promoting the widest use across the health and care landscape of our definition of digital literacy and the digital capabilities that sit within that definition. Our latest document‘Improving digital literacy’, published today, explains what digital literacy is and why it is important.

Ian Cumming, our Chief Executive, and Janet Davies, RCN’s Chief Executive and General Secretary, have written the foreword for the joint document which outlines:

  • Why digital capabilities are so important in the provision of the best care
  • Why the right digital knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes are important and relevant to each and all of us working in health and care
  • What those digital capabilities are
  • Work undertaken to date on the digital literacy programme of work.

The document also highlights the RCN’s focus on developing digital capabilities in the nursing and midwifery workforce and why this will bring tangible benefits to citizens and patients.