The effects of mindfulness-based interventions for health and social care undergraduate students

Health and social care undergraduate students experience stress due to high workloads and pressure to perform | Psychology, Health & Medicine

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Consequences include depression and burnout. Mindfulness may be a suitable way to reduce stress in health and social care degree courses. The objective of this systematic review is to identify and critically appraise the literature on the effects of Mindfulness-Based Interventions for health and social care undergraduate students.

PubMed, EMBASE, Psych Info, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library and Academic Search Complete were searched from inception to 21st November 2016. Studies that delivered Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, or an intervention modelled closely on these, to health or social care undergraduate students were included. Eleven studies, representing medicine, nursing and psychology students met the inclusion criteria. The most commonly used measurement tools were; the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and the General Health Questionnaire.

Short term benefits relating to stress and mood were reported, despite all but one study condensing the curriculum. Gender and personality emerged as factors likely to affect intervention results. Further research with long-term follow-up is required to definitively conclude that mindfulness is an appropriate intervention to mentally prepare health and social care undergraduate students for their future careers.

Full reference: O’Driscoll, M. et al. (2017) The effects of mindfulness-based interventions for health and social care undergraduate students – a systematic review of the literature. Psychology, Health & Medicine. Vol. 22 (Issue 7) pp. 851-865

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Health Education England: annual report

Annual report and accounts for Health Education England for 2016 to 2017.

The fourth HEE Annual report  outlines the achievements over the last year: outlining
how HEE continue to help improve the quality of care for patients by focussing on and investing in the education and training of the workforce which delivers that care,
now and in the future.

This vision of higher quality care is articulated in the Five Year Forward View (5YFV), which HEE co-created and now helps deliver nationally, regionally and locally through Local Workforce Action Boards (LWABs).

LWABs are where the workforce issues of Sustainability and Transformation Plans are worked through together with HEE’s partners; making sure the right conversations happen with the right people at the right time.

NHS Bursary Scheme rules 2017

Information about the NHS Bursary Scheme new rules applicable for the academic year 2017 to 2018, including 2 new schemes | DoH

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Students who began their studies before 1 September 2012 and are continuing training in the 2017 to 2018 academic year should refer to the NHS Bursary Scheme old rules (seventeenth edition).

Transitional Arrangements for 2017 to 2018 (first edition) is a scheme for new students beginning eligible pre-registration programmes between 1 August 2017 and 31 July 2018. Eligible programmes include postgraduate healthcare programmes, dental hygiene and dental therapy programmes and part-time programmes within the transitional capping arrangements.

Learning Support Fund for 2017 to 2018 (first edition) gives information about allowances for eligible students beginning pre-registration healthcare programmes on or after 1 August 2017. Allowances include:

  • Child Dependants Allowance
  • Exceptional Support Fund
  • Travel and dual accommodation expenses

NHS Bursary Scheme new rules for academic year 2017 to 2018

Government ‘reneging on promise to fund 10,000 extra nursing places’

Scrapping nursing bursaries was supposed to expand training places – but that pledge has been quietly dropped, universities say | The Guardian

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Universities are warning that the government is quietly reneging on its promise to provide 10,000 new nursing degree places, intended to relieve pressure on the NHS.

Student nurses must spend 50% of their degree working under supervision, usually in a hospital. But universities have told Education Guardian that not a single extra nursing training place has been funded or allocated for the future. It would cost £15m over five years to fund training placements for 10,000 new nurses, according to the Council of Deans of Health, the body that represents university faculties of nursing.

Applications to study nursing in the new 2017-18 academic year have slumped by 23% compared with last year, after the abolition of bursaries. The government said last year it would free up £800m and pay for an extra 10,000 places by ending bursaries and shifting student nurses to the standard system of £9,000-a-year tuition fees supported by loans. Angry academics now say this was a hollow promise.

Read the full news story here

New workforce supply resource from NHS Employers

NHS Employers has developed a range of new workforce supply web pages to support healthcare employers.

The resource has been set up to help organisations consider the political and social context they are employing staff in, and to develop a workforce strategy that is wide ranging, yet achievable. It addresses the challenges employers face in terms of planning for educating, recruiting, developing and retaining their staff.

Visit the Workforce Supply resource here

 

Professional Development Framework for Educators

The Educator Hub is a web-based multiprofessional e-learning resource for clinical educators | HEE

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Image source: HEE

It brings together video-based modules from HEE Kent, Surrey, Sussex’s etft platform together with the more academic ones from London’s Multiprofessional Faculty Development site. Nearly 50 modules will be available initially, with complementary resources from elsewhere to be included in due course.

Modules are linked to the new ‘Professional Development Framework for Educators’ which is being adopted in London and South East in the first instance. The framework domains map to professional regulatory standards for education and training including HEE’s Quality Framework standards and are applicable to all educators working in clinical practice and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) as guidance for best practice.

The framework areas are:

  • Ensuring safe and effective patient care through training
  • Establishing and maintaining an environment for learning
  • Teaching and facilitating learning
  • Enhancing learning through assessment
  • Supporting and monitoring educational progress
  • Guiding personal and professional development
  • Continuing professional development as an educator

Find out more here

Expansion of undergraduate medical education

Government outlines plans for expanding medical training | Department of Health | OnMedcia

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The Department of Health has published details of its plans to expand the number of undergraduate training places in England, which include expecting newly trained doctors to work for the NHS for more than five years.

The plans, revealed in a consultation document, aim to increase the home-grown medical workforce by 25%. Currently more than 6,000 university training places are available each year for prospective new doctors, but the plan is to increase this number by up to an extra 1,500 each year from September 2018.

It costs £230,000 to train a doctor in England, and the proposals include plans to obtain a return on this investment, by expecting new doctors to work for the NHS for a minimum number of years, otherwise they will be expected to repay some of their training costs.

A similar system “return of service” programme is already used by the armed forces for certain professions. The consultation asks whether a similar system should be introduced to the NHS for doctor training courses and, if so, how long this minimum term of service should be, suggesting that anything from two to more than five might be expected.

Full document: Expansion of undergraduate medical education: a consultation on how to maximise the benefits from the increases in medical student numbers.