Government ‘reneging on promise to fund 10,000 extra nursing places’

Scrapping nursing bursaries was supposed to expand training places – but that pledge has been quietly dropped, universities say | The Guardian

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Universities are warning that the government is quietly reneging on its promise to provide 10,000 new nursing degree places, intended to relieve pressure on the NHS.

Student nurses must spend 50% of their degree working under supervision, usually in a hospital. But universities have told Education Guardian that not a single extra nursing training place has been funded or allocated for the future. It would cost £15m over five years to fund training placements for 10,000 new nurses, according to the Council of Deans of Health, the body that represents university faculties of nursing.

Applications to study nursing in the new 2017-18 academic year have slumped by 23% compared with last year, after the abolition of bursaries. The government said last year it would free up £800m and pay for an extra 10,000 places by ending bursaries and shifting student nurses to the standard system of £9,000-a-year tuition fees supported by loans. Angry academics now say this was a hollow promise.

Read the full news story here

New workforce supply resource from NHS Employers

NHS Employers has developed a range of new workforce supply web pages to support healthcare employers.

The resource has been set up to help organisations consider the political and social context they are employing staff in, and to develop a workforce strategy that is wide ranging, yet achievable. It addresses the challenges employers face in terms of planning for educating, recruiting, developing and retaining their staff.

Visit the Workforce Supply resource here

 

Professional Development Framework for Educators

The Educator Hub is a web-based multiprofessional e-learning resource for clinical educators | HEE

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Image source: HEE

It brings together video-based modules from HEE Kent, Surrey, Sussex’s etft platform together with the more academic ones from London’s Multiprofessional Faculty Development site. Nearly 50 modules will be available initially, with complementary resources from elsewhere to be included in due course.

Modules are linked to the new ‘Professional Development Framework for Educators’ which is being adopted in London and South East in the first instance. The framework domains map to professional regulatory standards for education and training including HEE’s Quality Framework standards and are applicable to all educators working in clinical practice and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) as guidance for best practice.

The framework areas are:

  • Ensuring safe and effective patient care through training
  • Establishing and maintaining an environment for learning
  • Teaching and facilitating learning
  • Enhancing learning through assessment
  • Supporting and monitoring educational progress
  • Guiding personal and professional development
  • Continuing professional development as an educator

Find out more here

Expansion of undergraduate medical education

Government outlines plans for expanding medical training | Department of Health | OnMedcia

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The Department of Health has published details of its plans to expand the number of undergraduate training places in England, which include expecting newly trained doctors to work for the NHS for more than five years.

The plans, revealed in a consultation document, aim to increase the home-grown medical workforce by 25%. Currently more than 6,000 university training places are available each year for prospective new doctors, but the plan is to increase this number by up to an extra 1,500 each year from September 2018.

It costs £230,000 to train a doctor in England, and the proposals include plans to obtain a return on this investment, by expecting new doctors to work for the NHS for a minimum number of years, otherwise they will be expected to repay some of their training costs.

A similar system “return of service” programme is already used by the armed forces for certain professions. The consultation asks whether a similar system should be introduced to the NHS for doctor training courses and, if so, how long this minimum term of service should be, suggesting that anything from two to more than five might be expected.

Full document: Expansion of undergraduate medical education: a consultation on how to maximise the benefits from the increases in medical student numbers.

Using Technology to Support Learning – confident, terrified or indifferent?

BMJ Evidence-Based Nursing Blog | Published online: 15 January 2017

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We are surrounded by technology that assists us in every aspect of our life and education is no exception. It has never been easier to access information and learning resources on an almost infinite number of topics. We can collaborate and attend conferences in virtual spaces and share ideas in real time or whenever we have a minute spare! Our learning can incorporate teacher-led instruction, be led by our own interest and desire to learn or a combination; what is becoming apparent is that social learning in digital forums is enhancing learning by bringing interested parties together

Read the full blog post here

The competencies of Registered Nurses working in care homes

Stanyon, M.R. et al. Age Ageing. Published online: January 6, 2017

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Background: registered Nurses (RNs) working in UK care homes receive most of their training in acute hospitals. At present the role of care home nursing is underdeveloped and it is seen as a low status career. We describe here research to define core competencies for RNs working in UK care homes.

 

Conclusion: the output of this study is an expert-consensus list of competencies for RNs working in care homes. This would be a firm basis on which to build a curriculum for this staff group.

Read the full abstract here

The importance of public health in the nursing curriculum

Ette, L. Evidence-Based Nursing blog. Published online: 12 December 2016

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It’s easy to imagine that public health is falling out of favour in the UK in the current era of austerity, which has ushered in cuts for local authorities, who are now predominantly responsible for the public health of their local population. With the Local Government Association (LGA) itself expressing concern and disappointment in the government’s approach to the funding of this essential remit, it would be easy to believe that improvements to public health are a fading aspiration.

However, the NHS’s own Five Year Forward Plan commits to ‘getting serious about prevention’, and cites examples of integrated models of care which are aimed at addressing health needs and promoting better health.

So what does this mean for nurses?  And what kind of nurse education do we need to deliver to ensure that future nurses are as equipped as possible to embrace and contribute to this challenging future?

Read the full blog post here