Attitudes on cost-effectiveness and equity: viewpoints of medical professionals

The aim of this study is to determine the attitudes of physicians and trainees in regard to the roles of both cost-effectiveness and equity in clinical decision making | BMJ Open

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Cost-effectiveness analysis does not accurately reflect the importance that medical professionals place on equity. Among medical professionals, practising physicians appear to be more egalitarian than residents-in-training, while medical students appear to be most utilitarian and cost-effective. Meanwhile, female respondents in all three cohorts favoured the more equitable option to a greater degree than their male counterparts. Healthcare policies that trade off equity in favour of cost-effectiveness may be unacceptable to many medical professionals, especially practising physicians and women.

Full reference: Li, D.G. et al. (2017) Attitudes on cost-effectiveness and equity: a cross-sectional study examining the viewpoints of medical professionals. BMJ Open 7:e017251.

Views on mandatory reporting of impaired health practitioners by their treating practitioners

Bismark, M.M. et al. (2016) BMJ Open. 6:e011988

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Objective: To explore the views and experiences of health sector professionals in Australia regarding a new national law requiring treating practitioners to report impaired health practitioners whose impairments came to their attention in the course of providing treatment.

Conclusions: Competing ethical considerations limit the willingness of Australian health practitioners to report impaired practitioner-patients under a mandatory reporting law. Improved understanding and implementation of the law may bolster the public protection offered by mandatory reports, reduce the need to breach practitioner-patient confidentiality and help align the law with the loyalty that practitioners feel to support, rather than punish, their impaired colleagues.

Read the full abstract and article here