New £10 million fund to help retain GPs

NHS England announces new £10 million fund to support and retain GPs.

NHS England has announced a new £10 million fund to support and retain GPs. £7 million will be made available to help GPs to stay in the workforce through a new Local GP Retention Fund. Guidance for delivery of this fund is provided in Local General Practitioners Retention Fund: guidance for NHS England Regional and Local Office Teams.

A further £3 million will be made available to establish seven intensive support sites in areas that have struggled most to retain GPs.  Details on these sites and plans for retention efforts there will be announced next month.

The fund will support local health services focussing on supporting newly qualified GPs or those within their first five years of practice, who are seriously considering leaving general practice or who are no longer clinically practising in the NHS in England but remain on the National Performers List (Medical).

Full story at NHS England

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Standards for general practice nurses

General Practice Nurse Standards: voluntary standards for education and practice | The Queen’s Nursing Institute 

The Queen’s Nursing Institute has launched General Practice Nurse Standards: voluntary standards for education and practice.  The standards have been designed to reflect the requirements of this role, working in new models of care and to reflect the rapid changes in the primary care environment.

Download: QNI/QNIS GPN Voluntary Standards Project Information

Nine in 10 GPs rated good or outstanding following CQC inspection

Care Quality Commission (CQC) report finds that at the end of its first inspection programme of general practices 4% were rated ‘outstanding’, 86% were ‘good’, 8% were ‘requires improvement’ and 2% were ‘inadequate’.

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Image source: http://www.cqc.org.uk

The state of care in general practice 2014 to 2017 presents findings from CQCs  programme of inspections of GP practices. This detailed analysis of the quality and safety of general medical practice in England has found that nearly 90% of general practices in England have been rated as ‘good’, making this the highest performing sector CQC regulates.

Full document: The state of care in general practice 2014 to 2017

Large scale general practice

Rosen, R. Kumpunen, S. Curry, N. Davies, A. Pettigrew, L. Kossarova, L. (2017) Summary booklets on lessons for large-scale general practice. | Nuffield Trust

In July 2016, the Nuffield Trust published Is bigger better? Lessons for large-scale general practice  which examined the factors affecting the evolution of general practice and its impact on quality, staff and patient experience.

The Nuffield Trust has now released four booklets which sit alongside this main report covering:

 

GP recruitment numbers rise slowly

GP full-time equivalent (FTE) numbers for England have risen slowly in the past quarter but doctors’ leaders have said the 1% rise is too little and too slow. | via OnMedica

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New data from NHS Digital published yesterday shows that the total GP full time equivalent (FTE) workforce in England was 34,242 as of 30 June, which was an increase of 321 (0.9%) from 33,921 in March.

The total GP headcount, as of the end of June, was 42,215, representing a rise of 324 (0.8%) from 41,891 in March.

These GP workforce statistics for England are compiled from the data supplied by approximately 7,500 GP practices across the country.

The BMA said the rises were worryingly small, showing an increase of barely 1%.

Full story at OnMedica

Related: Renewed drive to recruit overseas GPs to UK

Struggling GP trainees given option to extend training for up to 18 months

Trainee GPs that struggle to meet required levels after the standard three years of training will now be able to extend their training by up to 18 months, Health Education England (HEE) has said | GP Online

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GP trainess who fail one or more exams at the end of their usual three years will be able to extend their training by 12 months, with a further exceptional six months. The move brings GP trainees more in-line with other medical specialties, which are currently allowed to extend their training by 12 months with a further exceptional 12 months.

The BMA welcomed the change, as it warned current system ‘unfairly disadvantage’ some of the more diverse groups of doctors. It is hoped the change will help prevent doctors who initially struggle to pass exams being lost to the profession.

The announcement comes alongside a commitment to make it easier for doctors from other specialties to enter GP training.

Read the full news story here