New models of care in practice

The NHS Confederation has published briefings on new models of care and how they are working in practice:

Constructive conversations with citizens when implementing new models of care

Wicked issues – complex problems that cannot be solved in a traditional fashion – are endemic in the NHS. They are nothing new. But the current challenges facing the NHS, social care and others are arguably the most ‘wicked’ yet | SCIE

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Image source: SCIE

This report summarises the findings from a research study which sought to explore how we can better broker constructive conversations with citizens to tackle wicked issues when implementing new models of care. The research was undertaken by the Social Care Institute for Excellence, working in partnership with PPL and the Institute for Government and funded by the Health Foundation’s Policy Challenge Fund.

Leading Across The Health And Care System: Lessons From Experience

This paper offers those who are leading new systems of care some guidance on how to address the challenges they face| The King’s Fund

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Image source: The King’s Fund

As the NHS seeks to move away from competition towards integration and to develop new models of care, individuals and organisations across the health and care system need to learn to work together to make the best use of collective skills and knowledge.

Part of our Leadership in action series, this paper offers those who are leading new systems of care some guidance on how to address the challenges they face. It draws on the Fund’s work on the development of new care models, sustainability and transformation plans, and accountable care organisations. It is also informed by the experience of people who have occupied system leadership roles and draws on case studies from our research and organisational development work.

Read the full report here

The Impact of Walk-in Centres and GP Co-operatives on Emergency Department Presentations

Crawford, J. et al. International Emergency Nursing | Published online: 18 April 2017

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Image source: Kake – Flickr // CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Highlights:

  • Workload and resource pressures on EDs require the development of applicable minor illness and injury pathways.
  • Walk-in-centres have the potential to reduce ED workloads but more work is required to substantiate this pathway.
  • GP cooperatives can reduce ED workloads but further evidence is required to be confident of the efficacy of this care pathway.

Read the full abstract here

Improving accountability in provision of new models

The National association of primary care has published Improving accountability in the provision of new models of care: winter review report. This is the latest report from the association’s quarterly meeting, which concentrated on whole population budgets and the metrics that may be used in the new care models that are prioritising primary care provision.

Patient experience of different regional models of urgent and emergency care

Foley, C. et al. (2017) BMJ Open. 7:e013339

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Objectives: To compare user experiences of 8 regional urgent and emergency care systems in the Republic of Ireland, and explore potential avenues for improvement.

Conclusions: No consistent relationship was found between the type of urgent and emergency care model in different regions and patient experience. Scale-level data may not offer a useful metric for exploring the impact of system-level service change.

Read the full article here

Tackling culture change to transform mental health services

Mandip Kaur for the King’s Fund Blog | 16th March 2017

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Traditionally, mental health services are delivered by Children and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) up until the age of 16 or 18 – or when a young person leaves school or college – at which point they’re expected to transition to adult mental health services. It’s long been recognised that this is a poor boundary for service transition, often having a further detrimental effect on mental health.

Forward Thinking Birmingham delivers mental health services for children and young people aged up to 25, combining the expertise of Birmingham Children’s Hospital, Worcester Health and Care Trust, Beacon UK, The Children’s Society and The Priory Group. The partnership’s vision is that Birmingham should be the first city where mental health problems are not a barrier to young people achieving their dreams. The transformational changes to the service were driven by the need to address disjointed and fragmented care provision, complicated service models, long waiting lists and rising demand. The service operates a ‘no wrong door’ policy and aims to provide joined-up care, focusing on individual needs, with improved access and choice for young people.

Read the full blog post here