Government ‘reneging on promise to fund 10,000 extra nursing places’

Scrapping nursing bursaries was supposed to expand training places – but that pledge has been quietly dropped, universities say | The Guardian

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Universities are warning that the government is quietly reneging on its promise to provide 10,000 new nursing degree places, intended to relieve pressure on the NHS.

Student nurses must spend 50% of their degree working under supervision, usually in a hospital. But universities have told Education Guardian that not a single extra nursing training place has been funded or allocated for the future. It would cost £15m over five years to fund training placements for 10,000 new nurses, according to the Council of Deans of Health, the body that represents university faculties of nursing.

Applications to study nursing in the new 2017-18 academic year have slumped by 23% compared with last year, after the abolition of bursaries. The government said last year it would free up £800m and pay for an extra 10,000 places by ending bursaries and shifting student nurses to the standard system of £9,000-a-year tuition fees supported by loans. Angry academics now say this was a hollow promise.

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Safe And Effective Staffing: The Real Picture

This report paints a picture of an NHS struggling without the nursing staff it knows it needs| Royal College of Nursing 

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Image source: RCN

This report calls for the rest of the UK to follow the example of Wales and enshrine safe staffing levels in law following analysis which shows that there is approximately 40,000 unfilled nurse posts in England with a further 12,000 health care support worker vacancies. The report finds that care providers are increasingly hiring fewer registered nursing staff and that four in five NHS nursing directors have reported concerns that their hospital relies on the goodwill of staff to keep services running.

Enabling Professionalism In Nursing And Midwifery Practice

This guide is aimed at all nurses and midwives and sets out what professionalism can look like in everyday practice | Nursing and Midwifery Council

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Image source: NMC

Professionalism means something to everyone who works as a nurse or midwife. Being an inspiring role model working in the best interests of people in your care, regardless of what position you hold and where you deliver care, is what really brings practice and behaviour together in harmony.  This guide demonstrates how applying the values of the code of conduct should be at the centre of all nursing and midwifery practice. For employers, it identifies key principles which will help them to provide practice environments that support and encourage professionalism among nurses and midwives.

Mindfulness training can reduce depression and anxiety among nurses

Hunter, L. (2017) BMJ Evidence-based Nursing. 20(2)

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Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research:

  • Mindfulness can help relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety among nurses and may improve patient care.

  • There is a need for future quantitative studies to measure the nurse-perceived benefits of mindfulness identified in qualitative research.

  • Mixed-methods reviews can help develop a more complete and clinically relevant understanding of a given topic.

Read the full commentary here

Read the original research article here

Updated revalidation standards and guidance

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) has updated its revalidation standards and guidance in line with a planned review and stakeholder feedback | NHS Employers

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Key changes

All documents except the Code have been revised. The standards and guidance includes:
  • New examples of circumstances which would not count towards practice hours,
  • Changes in How to revalidate and the guidance sheet to explain why the reflective discussion partner must be a registrant and why the discussion must be a single discussion with one other person.
  • Changes to the continuing professional development (CPD) examples to clarify that CPD is separate and different from everyday learning.
  • An explanation on how confirmation differs from appraisal.
  • Amendments to the alternative support arrangements guidance sheet.

More detail at NHS Employers

Download the revised guidance documents via NMC

New report aims to make General Practice Nursing a top career destination

Improving training available in GP practice settings and raising the profile of the role  is key to helping to retain and expand the General Practice Nursing (GPN) workforce | Health Education England.

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Image source: HEE

Key report recommendations include:

  • improving training capacity for the general practice nurse workforce by providing access to accredited training to equip them for each level of their role;
  • raising the profile of general practice nursing, to increase the uptake of the role as a first-destination career;
  • developing GPN educator roles to cover all CCG areas, including the promotion of mentor training for all GPNs  to retain the knowledge and expertise of existing GPNs; and
  • the development of a sustainable and easily accessible ‘how-to’ toolkit and web based resource to support the implementation of general practice nursing workforce initiatives.
  • a nationwide standardised general practice nursing ‘return to practice’ education programme which includes a general practice placement, mentorship and appropriate support to meet the NMC requirements for ‘return to practice’.

Read the full report here

MPs to debate call to remove 1% nurse pay cap

MPs will today debate a call for the lifting of the 1% pay cap on public sector workers | OnMedica

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Catherine McKinnell, MP for Newcastle North, will lead the debate, which resulted from a petition started by Royal College of Nursing member Danielle Tiplady and signed by over 100,000 people.

At 4.30pm today members will debate the motion: “That this House has considered e-petition 168127 relating to pay restraint for Agenda for Change NHS staff.”

Janet Davies, Chief Executive and General Secretary of the RCN, said: “Nursing staff are the backbone of the health service, working under immense pressure to take care of people at their most vulnerable.

Read the full news story here