New, updated toolkit for performance management

NHS Employers  | Refresh your people performance management skills

NHS Employers  have updated their performance management toolkit to include new guidance and incorporate links to resources. It is intended to support NHS managers to talk about performance with staff and to nurture talent in their teams.

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Image source: nhsemployers.org

The toolkit provides practical support to help support NHS managers to develop the skills needed to deal with key management situations confidently and consistently. It uses questions, such as:

  • How do you review performance on an ongoing basis?
  • What to do if a member of your team is underperforming?
  • How do you give constructive feedback?
  • How can you support staff who are high achieving?

There is also a short video which accompanies the toolkit, it can be viewed on this page 

The full booklet can be downloaded here 

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How is the NHS performing? March 2018 quarterly monitoring report

The King’s Fund| March 2018 | How is the NHS performing? March 2018 quarterly monitoring report 

The King’s Fund has released its quarterly monitoring report (QMR) of NHS performance. Its analysis finds increased numbers of patients are facing long waits for hospital treatment, with those experiencing the longest delay often most in need of treatment. As demand for services is continuing to rise, the think tank finds it unlikely that meeting waiting time targets will become more achievable, with implications for how the NHS protects patients waiting the longest (The King’s Fund).

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Since the last QMR there has been a Budget, new planning guidance for 2018/19 and most (but not all) of winter.  The King’s Fund considers the impact of these factors together with their latest survey data sources to discuss the current position and forecast for finance and performance.

The report focuses on four key areas:

  • Finance
  • Perforamce
  • Waiting times: making the sickest wait longest
  • Looking to the future

It is available at the King’s Fund 

National A&E Dashboard User Guide

The National A&E Dashboard has been developed by NHS Improvement  to provide a consolidated view of A&E information and can be shared between various central NHS bodies.

The dashboard provides a consistent understanding of A&E performance through the collection of daily situation report (SitRep) data, and enables the NHS to identify pressure points in the system and intervene accordingly.

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Data is submitted by trusts on a daily basis for the previous 24 hours and snapshots of the data are taken at 8am. Trusts submit this data in the morning and submissions close in the afternoon for reporting purposes.

It takes the user through:

  • how to access the A&E dashboard
  • a quick overview and explanation of key functions
  • details of each screen with screen shots
  • descriptions about metrics
  • easy navigation tips
  • commonly asked questions

 

Full information from  NHS Improvement

Accountability and performance management arrangements for CCGs

This report explores the accountability and performance management arrangements for CCGs and looks at the implications of  STPs and accountable care systems for these| The Nuffield Trust

The NHS has developed systems to hold both providers and commissioners of NHS services to account. These have arguably become more complex with the introduction  of 44 sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs). This report from the Nuffield Trust draws on analysis and insights from the current system, and explores the challenges and opportunities presented by STPs for accountability in the NHS. It is based on 13 interviews with senior CCG leaders and NHS England policy makers which took place in September 2016.

The report also explores how commissioners and providers respond to different approaches to accountability and performance management. The report then considers the implications of this learning for the future development of STPs, accountable care organisations and accountable care systems.

Full report: A two-way street: what can CCGs teach us about accountability in STPs?

Related Nuffield Trust blog: Staying accountable: NHS leadership in hard times

The death of QOF?

The death of QOF? | BMJ Talk Medicine Podcast

The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) is one of the most ambitious pay-for-performance schemes introduced into any health system. It’s now being scrapped by bits of the NHS, and is under reform elsewhere.

Martin Marshall, GP and professor of Health Improvement at University College London, thinks it’s time to rethink the experiment. This BMJ Talk Medicine podcast discusses how we got here, what we’ve learned, and what will replace QOF.

Full editorial: The future of the Quality and Outcomes Framework in England

CQC State of Care report

State of Care is the Care Quality Commission’s annual assessment of health and social care in England. The report looks at the trends, highlights examples of good and outstanding care, and identifies factors that maintain high-quality care.

This year’s report shows that the quality of care has been maintained despite a number of challenges. Most people are receiving good, safe care and many services that were previously rated inadequate have made the necessary changes and improved.

The CQC stress that the fact that quality has been maintained in the face of a number of challenges is testament to the hard work and dedication of staff and leaders. However, as the system continues to struggle with increasingly complex demand, access and cost, future quality is precarious.

The report makes the following points:

  • Health and care services are at full stretch
  • Care providers are under pressure and staff resilience is not inexhaustible
  • The quality of care across England is mostly good
  • Quality has improved overall, but there is too much variation and some services have deteriorated
  • To put people first, there must be more local collaboration and joined-up care

 

See also Health Foundation response to CQC State of Care Report

 

NHS Commissioning of Specialised Services

This Commons Library briefing paper looks at the commissioning of specialised services by the NHS in England, for patients with rare or complex conditions | House of Commons Library

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How the commissioning process works is set out in further detail, as well as analysis of the financial management and transparency of specialised commissioning, and recent reforms introduced by NICE and NHS England, including reforms to the Cancer Drugs Fund.

The specialised commissioning budget for 2017/18 is £16.4 billion, 14.9% of the total NHS budget, and is set to rise to 15.8% by 2020/21 to reflect the increasing use of new treatments for previously untreatable conditions.

In its 2016 report, the National Audit Office (NAO) highlighted problems that NHS England had experienced in living within its budget. Some of the reasons for this included an underestimation of the budget required to effectively commission services when NHS England took over commissioning responsibility in 2013, as well as a lack of effective data on how services are commissioned on a regional basis, and problems with effective negotiation of prices with pharmaceutical companies.

This briefing paper looks in details at some of the issues highlighted by the NAO, and recent changes to the commissioning process that allow for a greater degree of cost control.