CQC State of Care report

State of Care is the Care Quality Commission’s annual assessment of health and social care in England. The report looks at the trends, highlights examples of good and outstanding care, and identifies factors that maintain high-quality care.

This year’s report shows that the quality of care has been maintained despite a number of challenges. Most people are receiving good, safe care and many services that were previously rated inadequate have made the necessary changes and improved.

The CQC stress that the fact that quality has been maintained in the face of a number of challenges is testament to the hard work and dedication of staff and leaders. However, as the system continues to struggle with increasingly complex demand, access and cost, future quality is precarious.

The report makes the following points:

  • Health and care services are at full stretch
  • Care providers are under pressure and staff resilience is not inexhaustible
  • The quality of care across England is mostly good
  • Quality has improved overall, but there is too much variation and some services have deteriorated
  • To put people first, there must be more local collaboration and joined-up care

 

See also Health Foundation response to CQC State of Care Report

 

Advertisements

Quality improvement

Making the case for quality improvement: lessons for NHS boards and leaders | The King’s Fund | The Health Foundation

This briefing outlines the following ten lessons for NHS leaders which provide a starting point for those seeking to embed quality improvement in their work:

  • Make quality improvement a leadership priority for boards.
  • Share responsibility for quality improvement with leaders at all levels.
  • Don’t look for magic bullets or quick fixes.
  • Develop the skills and capabilities for improvement.
  • Have a consistent and coherent approach to quality improvement.
  • Use data effectively.
  • Focus on relationships and culture.
  • Enable and support frontline staff to engage in quality improvement.
  • Involve patients, service users and carers.
  • Work as a system.

The briefing makes the case for quality improvement to be at the heart of local plans for redesigning NHS services.

Full report available here

Nine in 10 GPs rated good or outstanding following CQC inspection

Care Quality Commission (CQC) report finds that at the end of its first inspection programme of general practices 4% were rated ‘outstanding’, 86% were ‘good’, 8% were ‘requires improvement’ and 2% were ‘inadequate’.

state of cqc

Image source: http://www.cqc.org.uk

The state of care in general practice 2014 to 2017 presents findings from CQCs  programme of inspections of GP practices. This detailed analysis of the quality and safety of general medical practice in England has found that nearly 90% of general practices in England have been rated as ‘good’, making this the highest performing sector CQC regulates.

Full document: The state of care in general practice 2014 to 2017

Improving quality of care through partnerships and collaboration

Partnerships for improvement: ingredients for success | The Health Foundation

together

The idea of partnerships and collaboration across organisational boundaries is at the heart of NHS reforms in England. This briefing from the Health Foundation looks at what makes successful partnerships between providers at an organisational level, providing a snapshot of some of the key ingredients needed for successful partnerships.

The report looks at a range of current organisational partnerships focusing on five different partnering arrangements. It also includes interviews with national leaders, and draws learning to help inform and guide policymakers and providers.

The report finds that partnering does have potential benefits, but these are not easy or quick to achieve. To have a meaningful impact on the quality of care, the right form of partnering needs to be used in the right context and it needs to be accompanied by the right set of enabling factors – as described by the report.

Full briefing: Partnerships for improvement: ingredients for success

Related: Health Foundation blog: Is together always better? How good are NHS organisations and the wider system at achieving the potential benefits of partnering?

Practical value in the NHS

The King’s Fund has previously highlighted the fact that addressing waste and variability in clinical work can create better value in the NHS. But what does value mean to people working in the NHS – and how it is being applied in practice? | The King’s Fund Blog

bank-17816_960_720.jpg

‘Value’ sounds like a familiar concept but it can mean different things to different people. One definition of value in the health and care sector is ‘health outcomes per dollar spent’, so attempts to increase value can look at either improving quality or reducing cost.

In early July we held a roundtable discussion with health service providers to better understand their approach to value improvement – initial research for a new project intended to understand the practical barriers and challenges that frontline clinical, operational and managerial leaders have encountered in pursuing better value health care. Experts who attended – including a chairman, chief executive, chief nurse, deputy chief operating officer, change leader, and representatives of national bodies – agreed that the emphasis should be on patient care. Clinicians are more likely to engage in a programme that revolves around the quality of services, and better care is typically less wasteful, so as one participant put it, ‘if you focus on quality, money will fall out’ [spending will reduce]. Consultants will often drive through successful programmes with change management teams, but we also discussed the role of junior doctors, nurses and therapists, who frequently witness low-value care and understand how to fix it. We know that substantial changes in practice can be delivered as we have seen, for example, in generic prescribing, reduced length of stay and the move towards day case surgery.

Read the full blog post here

Quality improvement in mental health

Quality improvement in mental health | The King’s Fund

This report explores the potential opportunities arising from the application of quality improvement approaches in the mental health sector and identifies relevant learning from organisations that have already adopted these approaches.

The authors were specifically interested in understanding how and why some mental health organisations have embraced quality improvement strategies and what has enabled them to do so. It explores what changes are needed from senior leaders to cultivate a quality improvement ethos within their organisation.    

Key findings

  • Embracing quality improvement requires a change in the traditional approach to leadership at all levels of an organisation, so that those closest to problems (staff and patients) can devise the best solutions and implement them.
  • Doing quality improvement at scale requires an appropriate organisational infrastructure, both to support frontline teams and to ensure that learning spreads and is taken up across the organisation.
  • Tools and approaches used in the acute hospital sector can be adapted for use in mental health care, including in community settings.
  • Success is most likely when there is fidelity to the chosen improvement method, and a sustained commitment over time.
  • The strong emphasis on co-production and service user involvement in mental health can be harnessed as a powerful asset in quality improvement work.

Download the full report: Quality improvement in mental health

Health Education England: annual report

Annual report and accounts for Health Education England for 2016 to 2017.

The fourth HEE Annual report  outlines the achievements over the last year: outlining
how HEE continue to help improve the quality of care for patients by focussing on and investing in the education and training of the workforce which delivers that care,
now and in the future.

This vision of higher quality care is articulated in the Five Year Forward View (5YFV), which HEE co-created and now helps deliver nationally, regionally and locally through Local Workforce Action Boards (LWABs).

LWABs are where the workforce issues of Sustainability and Transformation Plans are worked through together with HEE’s partners; making sure the right conversations happen with the right people at the right time.