Tackling variations in clinical care: Assessing the Getting It Right First Time (GIRFT) programme

The Getting It Right First Time (GIRFT) programme aims to bring about higher-quality care in hospitals, at lower cost, by reducing unwanted variations in services and practices | The King’s Fund

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Image source: The King’s Fund

It uses national data to identify the variations and outcomes, shares that data with all those concerned with a service – not only clinicians, but also clinical and medical directors, managers and chief executives – and monitors the changes that are implemented.

The programme began with orthopaedics and is now being rolled out to 32 different surgical and medical specialisms across the English NHS. Through an informal assessment of the programme, this paper sets out what the programme is, why it is needed, what is different about it, what it has achieved, what challenges it faces and what potential it has. It also contains vignettes illustrating hospitals’ experiences of the programme.

CQC seeking views on their next phase of regulation

The CQC is consulting on a further set of proposals which will help shape the next phase of regulation of health and social care in England.

light-bulb-1002783_1920For the next eight weeks, anyone with an interest is encouraged to have their say.

The proposals include:

  • Changes to the regulation of primary medical services such as GPs and dentists and adult social care services such as care homes and home-care services.
  • This includes the frequency and intensity of inspections and how the CQC monitor, provide and gather intelligence.
  • Improvements to the structure of registration and the definition of ‘registered providers’.
  • Further information on how the CQC will monitor, inspect and rate new models of care and large or complex providers.

Take part in the new consultation

Changes affecting the NHS

NHS Confederation has published What comes into force in April 2017?

This briefing summarises new measures, requirements and legislative changes coming into force this month that will affect NHS organisations, staff, patients and service users across England. It covers arm’s length bodies, charges, e-prescribing, finance, general practice, innovation, integration, personal health budgets, quality, reconfiguration and workforce.

NHS efficiency map

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The Healthcare Financial Management Association and NHS Improvement have updated the NHS efficiency map.

The map is a tool that promotes best practice in identifying, delivering and monitoring cost improvement programmes in the NHS.  It contains links to a range of tools and guidance to help NHS bodies improve their efficiency.

Aimed at NHS finance directors and their teams and other NHS staff with an interest in the delivery of cost improvement programmes, the purpose of the NHS efficiency map is to highlight existing resources on eliminating waste, increasing efficiency and at the same time improving quality and safety.

NHS acute hospitals report

The Care Quality Commission has published The state of care in NHS acute hospitals: 2014 to 2016: findings from the end of CQC’s programme of NHS acute comprehensive inspections.

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Image source: http://www.cqc.org.uk

The report has been derived from three years’ worth of CHC inspections into the quality of care being provided by NHS acute hospitals. It finds that most hospitals are delivering good quality care and looking after patients well, however, some trusts have blind spots about the quality of care they are delivering in a particular core service, even in some trusts rated good overall.

Related: CQC right to say care is at risk due to unprecedented pressure on hospitals | NHS Providers

Quality improvement: learning from innovations in the vanguards

The King’s Fund Blog | By Don Berwick

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I have recently returned from an exciting, whirlwind tour of another set of new care models sites. This was my fourth such tour. My goal for these visits, which I make as an International Visiting Fellow for The King’s Fund, is to attempt to understand what the vanguard organisations are trying to do, how well they are faring, and how they might progress even better and faster. On this trip, the additional question was: ‘How can these lessons and models be spread more widely across the NHS?’

Read the full blog post here

National health organisations publish a shared commitment to quality

The National Quality Board (NQB) has today (21 December) published a new framework that will promote improved quality criteria across all national health organisations for the first time | NHS England

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Image source: NHS England

The new publication provides a nationally agreed definition of quality and guide for clinical and managerial leaders wanting to improve quality.

The approach has been agreed by the national bodies that form the NQB to provide more consistency and to enable the system to work together more effectively.

It is part of work to cut unnecessary red tape by reducing duplication and aligning demands on professionals for information on the quality of services.

The document sets out a range of measures to achieve higher and consistent standards including: the need for a common language that people who use services understand; to ensure commissioners and providers experience a coherent system of assurance, measurement and regulation; that professionals and staff are equipped and empowered to deliver safe, effective, and responsive care; and leaders should create a culture where people feel free to speak up when something goes wrong.

Read the full overview here

Read the full framework here