How fixing the NHS’s broken pay system can deliver better outcomes for patients

An NHS bonus: how fixing the NHS’s broken pay system can deliver better outcomes for patients | Centre for Policy Studies

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Image source: http://www.cps.org.uk

This report argues that by introducing greater flexibility into the system, and linking pay more closely with performance and objectives, both NHS productivity and patient outcomes could be improved. It urges the Government, and NHS managers, to make reform of the pay system an urgent priority as part of the new funding settlement.

Full report available here

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Developing new care models through NHS vanguards

The vanguard programme, one of NHS England’s attempts to better meet patients’ needs and deliver savings by developing new care models to integrate health and social care services, has not delivered the depth and scale of transformed services it aimed for at the beginning of the programme, according to this report by the National Audit Office.

A key objective of the programme was to design new care models that could be quickly replicated across England. NHS England selected 50 sites to act as ‘vanguards’ which might entail, for example, joining up GP, hospital and community and mental health services in an integrated network or single organisation in one area to improve healthcare for patients.

NHS England’s early planning assumption was £2.2 billion of funding for new care models between 2016-17 and 2020-21, but it used much of the funding to reduce deficits faced by hospitals. Actual direct funding of vanguards was £329 million over three years from 2015-16, with another £60 million spent by NHS England on central support for vanguards. Consequently, with less funding for transformation, the original intention to expand the programme was not realised.

Despite not meeting its original intention to expand the models across the country, vanguards have made progress in developing new care models. NHS England forecasts that vanguards will make net savings. As at April 2018, it estimated that vanguards would secure £324 million net savings annually by 2020-21, which is 90% of the £360 million that had been expected.

Full report:  Developing new care models through NHS vanguards

See also: National Audit Office press release

The five essential components of value-based approaches to health and care

Against a backdrop of financial pressures, growing demand for services and the quest for transformation of local services, the concept of value in the health and care system is one which has gained increasing prominence over recent years. This paper explores how we can spread the adoption of value-based healthcare across all parts of the system and ensure that we maximise the benefits for those who use NHS and wider services | NHS Confederation

This paper explores the central challenge of how to take value-based healthcare to the next stage and embed it across the whole system.

It explores five key characteristics/factors which support the wholesale adoption of value-based healthcare approaches. These are:

  • Learning and adapting through the adoption of innovation
  • Managing risk
  • Making best use of data
  • Thinking about pathways across the whole system
  • Listening to patients.

Full document: Taking the value-based agenda forward: The five essential components of value-based approaches to health and care

Improving the experiences of people who use services

This briefing looks at what the vanguards have been doing to improve the way people experience and interact with health and care services, and shares the lessons that other organisations and partnerships can take from the vanguards’ experiences | NHS Providers

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This final briefing in the Learning from the new care models series highlights how the vanguards are improving the experiences of people using services and their families.

The briefing looks at the work of the vanguards in the following areas:

  • Coordinating care around peoples’ needs
  • Ensuring people receive high-quality care wherever they are
  • Specialist care closer to home
  • Reducing the need to travel
  • Directing people to the right care, faster
  • Supporting people to manage long-term conditions
  • Supporting people to develop self-confidence
  • Tailoring care for people with the greatest needs
  • Making access to urgent care as simple as possible
  • Promoting health and wellbeing among people and communities
  • Helping people connect
  • Supporting carers to stay well
  • Working with people to design services that work for them

Full briefing:
Learning from the vanguards: improving the experiences of people who use services

Long-term sustainability of the NHS and social care

Government response to the report on long-term sustainability of the NHS and adult social care | The Department of Health and Social Care  

This paper responds to the Lords Select Committee report stating that significant efficiencies will be needed to make the NHS and social care system sustainable for the long term.

The original report made 34 recommendations in the areas of:

  • service transformation
  • funding the NHS and adult social care
  • innovation technology and productivity
  • public health, prevention and patient responsibility
  • lasting political consensus

 

Full document: Government response to the Lords Select Committee report on Long-Term Sustainability of the NHS and Adult Social Care| The Department of Health and Social Care

 

Developing People – Improving Care

One year on from the launch of the Developing People- Improving Care, this report  highlights how leaders across health and social care have implemented the framework | NHS Improvement

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Image source: improvement.nhs.uk

In 2016, thirteen organisations from health, social care and local government came together to create the Developing People Improving Care framework, based on national and international research, and conversations held with people across the health and care system.

One year on, this publication highlights some of the work taking place, demonstrating the steps people are already taking to ensure systems of compassion, inclusion and improvement, are at the core of the health and care system.  The report also sets out plans for the year ahead.

Full report: Developing People- Improving Care