A journey to improved staff engagement – in our shoes

NHS Employers, August 2017

Imperial-college

Source: NHS Employers

 

This case study looks at how Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust has significantly improved their staff engagement levels using new and innovative methods. Through engaging with staff to understand more about how they are feeling at work, engagement levels have improved from the 2015 score of 3.71 to 3.8 in 2016, which was the largest year-on-year increase of all acute trusts in London.

 

 

Encouraging speaking up through trust wide engagement

NHS Employers

York-Speaking-up

Source: NHS Employers

This shared learning example describes how Lisa Smith, Freedom to Speak Up guardian in York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has engaged with multiple sites to help foster a positive, safe culture of speaking up.

With one of the largest NHS geographies in the UK, find out more about the methods being used by Lisa at York to promote awareness of raising concerns, including attending flu clinics to reach out to as many staff as possib

Involving staff with quality improvement initiatives

NHS Employers has published Staff involvement, quality improvement and staff engagement:  the missing links.

This briefing aims to help managers and leaders understand more about how involving staff with quality improvement initiatives can have a significant impact on staff engagement levels.

Involving staff in quality improvement decision-making, planning and delivery has always been a good idea. However, at a time of unprecedented pressures and financial challenges it is an issue of the highest importance.

This new briefing explores the benefits, approaches and working examples of how organisations are involving staff with their quality improvement activities.

Read more about staff engagement initiatives across the NHS here.

Using appreciative inquiry to implement person-centred dementia care in hospital wards

Scerri, A. et al. Dementia. Published online: October 6 2016

conversation-545621_960_720

The quality of care of persons with dementia in hospitals is not optimal and can be challenging. Moreover, staff may find difficulty in translating what they have learned during training into practice. This paper report the development and evaluation of a set of workshops using an appreciative inquiry approach to implement person-centred dementia care in two hospital wards.

Staff worked collaboratively to develop a ward vision and to implement a number of action plans. Using appreciative inquiry approach, staff attitudes towards persons with dementia improved, inter-professional collaboration was enhanced and small changes in staff practices were noted. Dementia care in hospitals can be enhanced by empowering staff to take small but concrete actions after they engage in appreciative inquiry workshops, during which they are listened to and appreciated for what they can contribute.

Read the abstract here