STP governance arrangements

The Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) has published Sustainability and transformation partnerships: developing robust governance arrangements.

This document examines governance arrangements within Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships, accountable care systems and new models of care. It includes a diagnostic tool which can help highlight where robust arrangements are already in place and where more work is required.

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STPs and accountable care

Supporting providers: STPs and accountable care | NHS Providers

NHS Providers are working to develop a programme of support that helps provider organisations adapt to the challenges and opportunities presented by the move to accountable care.

The programme, Supporting Providers: STPs and accountable care, will be developed in close collaboration with NHS trusts over the next six weeks. The programme aims to ensure there is the right support and a strong advocate making the case for NHS trusts as they move to accountable care structures that deliver more integrated care for the public.

Elements to support trusts will include:

  • Developing new and effective relationships with local authorities, primary care and commissioners
  • Responding to specific challenges such as moving care closer to home, prioritising mental health, workforce strategy and getting the most out of the NHS estate
  • Exploring new ways to support change, identifying “enablers” including new approaches to contracting, different financial flows, adopting risk stratification and whole population health management approaches, and developing STP level governance arrangements.

More detail at NHS Providers

Transformational change

Leading Large Scale Change: A practical guide | NHS England Sustainable Improvement Team | NHS England Horizons Team

This guide from NHS England has been produced to help all those involved in seeking to achieve transformational change in complex health and care environments. This is a fully revised update of the original 2011 publication, responding to current health and care policy and practice, and introducing new concepts, tools and techniques to help deliver successful large scale change. It is relevant to all those involved in transformational change programmes such as Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) and the development of new care models, and has relevance across public services.

The publication includes:

  • Updates on the leading transformational change models
  • The latest thinking from national and global improvement
    experts and change leaders
  • New tools, techniques and tips to help effectively progress
    large scale change programmes
  • Case studies and learning that will help leaders and
    change agents in health and care and across public
    services
  • Signposting to a host of new online resources including
    videos, presentations and digital media links.

Full document: Leading Large Scale Change: A guide to leading large scale change through complex health and social care environments

 

Sustainability and transformation plans in London

Sustainability and transformation plans in London: an independent analysis of the October 2016 STPs | The Kings Fund | Nuffield Trust

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This report looks at the five Sustainability and Transformation Plans in London, their contents and common themes.  The authors, from The King’s Fund and the Nuffield Trust, assess the main issues and risks to be addressed across the plans. They make a small number of recommendations for the future of the STP process in London, focusing specifically on the role of London-wide action in taking forward the plans.  The report includes a brief update on progress since March 2017.

Download the full report here

Investment in NHS transformation projects

Secretary of State for Health and NHS England have announced £325m of capital investment for local projects that will help the NHS to modernise and transform care for patients.

Patients will see this investment deliver faster diagnosis for conditions like cancer, easier access to mental health care, expansion of A&Es, shorter waits for operations, and more services in GPs surgeries. This initial tranche of funding has been targeted at the strongest and most advanced schemes in STPs.

Read more via NHS England

Additional link: RCGP press release

Health Education England: annual report

Annual report and accounts for Health Education England for 2016 to 2017.

The fourth HEE Annual report  outlines the achievements over the last year: outlining
how HEE continue to help improve the quality of care for patients by focussing on and investing in the education and training of the workforce which delivers that care,
now and in the future.

This vision of higher quality care is articulated in the Five Year Forward View (5YFV), which HEE co-created and now helps deliver nationally, regionally and locally through Local Workforce Action Boards (LWABs).

LWABs are where the workforce issues of Sustainability and Transformation Plans are worked through together with HEE’s partners; making sure the right conversations happen with the right people at the right time.

Councillors’ perceptions of sustainability and transformation partnerships

Survey results strongly support the messages we have been hearing for months – STPs are largely excluding councillors from the STP planning process | LGA

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This document reports key findings from a survey of councillors carried out by the Local Government Association (LGA) between 6 April and 11 May 2017. The survey sought to  establish a clear national picture of local councillors’ views and experiences of their local Sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP).

Single tier and county councils were targeted as they have adult social care and public health statutory duties, as well as a statutory duty to maintain a health and wellbeing board. Chairs of health and wellbeing boards and/or relevant portfolio holders, many of whom are also leaders or deputy leaders of councils, were invited to respond to the survey. A few additional respondents were also engaged through circulation of the survey in relevant online publications.

The survey was completed by 81 respondents from 68 councils, including two districts. Further information regarding methodology and respondents is outlined in appendix A at the end of this report. Council representation across regions and council types is outlined in appendices B and C.