Dementia training programmes for staff working in general hospital settings

Although literature describing and evaluating training programmes in hospital settings increased in recent years, there are no reviews that summarise these programmes | Aging & Mental Health 

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Objectives: This review sought to address this, by collecting the current evidence on dementia training programmes directed to staff working in general hospitals.

Results: Fourteen peer-reviewed studies were identified with the majority being pre-test post-test investigations. No randomised controlled trials were found. Methodological quality was variable with selection bias being the major limitation. There was a great variability in the development and mode of delivery although, interdisciplinary ward based, tailor-made, short sessions using experiential and active learning were the most utilised. The majority of the studies mainly evaluated learning, with few studies evaluating changes in staff behaviour/practices and patients’ outcomes.

Conclusion: This review indicates that high quality studies are needed that especially evaluate staff behaviours and patient outcomes and their sustainability over time. It also highlights measures that could be used to develop and deliver training programmes in hospital settings.

Full reference: Scerri, A. et al. (2017) Dementia training programmes for staff working in general hospital settings – a systematic review of the literature. Aging & Mental Health. Vol. 21 (no. 8) pp.783-796

Feasibility and Utility of Online Dementia Care Training for Hospital Staff

Hobday, J.H. et al. (2017) Research in Gerontological Nursing (10)2 pp. 58-65

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The current project tested the feasibility and utility of the CARES® Dementia-Friendly Hospital™ (CDFH) program, a 4-module, online training program for nursing assistants (NAs) and allied hospital workers (AHWs) who provide care to individuals with dementia.

A single group pretest/posttest design was used for 25 hospital NAs/AHWs, and quantitative and qualitative data were collected to determine whether NAs’/AHWs’ knowledge of hospital-based dementia care significantly increased, and if CDFH was perceived as useful and acceptable.

Dementia care knowledge increased significantly (p < 0.001). Open- and closed-ended data suggested that the delivery of online training to NAs/AHWs to enhance dementia care is feasible, useful, and efficient.

Ongoing gaps in care exist for individuals with dementia in hospitals, and delivering robust training for NAs/AHWs may serve as an effective modality to enhance quality of dementia care in such settings.

Read the full article here

Expansion of undergraduate medical education

Government outlines plans for expanding medical training | Department of Health | OnMedcia

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The Department of Health has published details of its plans to expand the number of undergraduate training places in England, which include expecting newly trained doctors to work for the NHS for more than five years.

The plans, revealed in a consultation document, aim to increase the home-grown medical workforce by 25%. Currently more than 6,000 university training places are available each year for prospective new doctors, but the plan is to increase this number by up to an extra 1,500 each year from September 2018.

It costs £230,000 to train a doctor in England, and the proposals include plans to obtain a return on this investment, by expecting new doctors to work for the NHS for a minimum number of years, otherwise they will be expected to repay some of their training costs.

A similar system “return of service” programme is already used by the armed forces for certain professions. The consultation asks whether a similar system should be introduced to the NHS for doctor training courses and, if so, how long this minimum term of service should be, suggesting that anything from two to more than five might be expected.

Full document: Expansion of undergraduate medical education: a consultation on how to maximise the benefits from the increases in medical student numbers.

Integrated health and social care apprenticeship

NHS Employers has published details of a case study from Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust who working with social care partners, have developed an integrated apprenticeship designed to provide a broad understanding of the different roles and responsibilities that exist in both health and social care.

Piloted over a year, the aim of the programme was to support those wishing to pursue a career across a range of care organisations. Starting with a two week clinical induction, the apprentices went on to undertake two six month placements, offered in a community care setting and on a hospital ward.

By experiencing the different systems and cultures, the apprenticeship enabled the apprentices to gain both knowledge and transferable skills while keeping a person-centred approach to care at its heart.

Medical school tripled GP trainee output after raising exposure to general practice

The University of Cambridge medical school more than tripled its output of GP trainees in 2016 after implementing measures to give students and F2 doctors greater exposure to general practice | GP Online

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Giving medical students and junior doctors more exposure to general practice placements could give a real boost to interest in GP careers, the outcome suggests.

For F2 leavers in 2016, almost a quarter (22%) of those who graduated from the University of Cambridge and went directly into further training opted to begin GP training, according to official data.

Just one year before, in 2015, the university had the lowest proportion of F2s entering GP training in the England, at just 7%.

Read the full news article here

Using Technology to Support Learning – confident, terrified or indifferent?

BMJ Evidence-Based Nursing Blog | Published online: 15 January 2017

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We are surrounded by technology that assists us in every aspect of our life and education is no exception. It has never been easier to access information and learning resources on an almost infinite number of topics. We can collaborate and attend conferences in virtual spaces and share ideas in real time or whenever we have a minute spare! Our learning can incorporate teacher-led instruction, be led by our own interest and desire to learn or a combination; what is becoming apparent is that social learning in digital forums is enhancing learning by bringing interested parties together

Read the full blog post here

The competencies of Registered Nurses working in care homes

Stanyon, M.R. et al. Age Ageing. Published online: January 6, 2017

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Background: registered Nurses (RNs) working in UK care homes receive most of their training in acute hospitals. At present the role of care home nursing is underdeveloped and it is seen as a low status career. We describe here research to define core competencies for RNs working in UK care homes.

 

Conclusion: the output of this study is an expert-consensus list of competencies for RNs working in care homes. This would be a firm basis on which to build a curriculum for this staff group.

Read the full abstract here