Integrated health and social care apprenticeship

NHS Employers has published details of a case study from Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust who working with social care partners, have developed an integrated apprenticeship designed to provide a broad understanding of the different roles and responsibilities that exist in both health and social care.

Piloted over a year, the aim of the programme was to support those wishing to pursue a career across a range of care organisations. Starting with a two week clinical induction, the apprentices went on to undertake two six month placements, offered in a community care setting and on a hospital ward.

By experiencing the different systems and cultures, the apprenticeship enabled the apprentices to gain both knowledge and transferable skills while keeping a person-centred approach to care at its heart.

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Medical school tripled GP trainee output after raising exposure to general practice

The University of Cambridge medical school more than tripled its output of GP trainees in 2016 after implementing measures to give students and F2 doctors greater exposure to general practice | GP Online

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Giving medical students and junior doctors more exposure to general practice placements could give a real boost to interest in GP careers, the outcome suggests.

For F2 leavers in 2016, almost a quarter (22%) of those who graduated from the University of Cambridge and went directly into further training opted to begin GP training, according to official data.

Just one year before, in 2015, the university had the lowest proportion of F2s entering GP training in the England, at just 7%.

Read the full news article here

Using Technology to Support Learning – confident, terrified or indifferent?

BMJ Evidence-Based Nursing Blog | Published online: 15 January 2017

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We are surrounded by technology that assists us in every aspect of our life and education is no exception. It has never been easier to access information and learning resources on an almost infinite number of topics. We can collaborate and attend conferences in virtual spaces and share ideas in real time or whenever we have a minute spare! Our learning can incorporate teacher-led instruction, be led by our own interest and desire to learn or a combination; what is becoming apparent is that social learning in digital forums is enhancing learning by bringing interested parties together

Read the full blog post here

The competencies of Registered Nurses working in care homes

Stanyon, M.R. et al. Age Ageing. Published online: January 6, 2017

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Background: registered Nurses (RNs) working in UK care homes receive most of their training in acute hospitals. At present the role of care home nursing is underdeveloped and it is seen as a low status career. We describe here research to define core competencies for RNs working in UK care homes.

 

Conclusion: the output of this study is an expert-consensus list of competencies for RNs working in care homes. This would be a firm basis on which to build a curriculum for this staff group.

Read the full abstract here

Managing from within the team

Most managers are members of the team they manage. This creates tension between the need to complete your own work and the need to manage the rest of the team | PCC

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This course helps managers to balance these two roles, manage their team’s workload and delegate effectively. It takes you through how to successfully communicate at different levels within your organisation as well as how to avoid or manage conflict within your team.

Managing from Within the Team enables you to:

  • Get the balance right between doing and managing
  • Manage time well and delegate effectively
  • Be conscious of responsibility as role model to the team and what it involves
  • See how behaviour can shape the behaviour of others
  • Know when and how to offer help to team members
  • Provide help to team members without taking over

Read the full overview here

NHS trust helps staff improve their confidence in conversational English

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust have partnered with Creative English to develop and deliver a learning programme for their international staff, designed to improve confidence in conversational English.

talk-1246935_960_720The trust serves a large and diverse population, ranging from the elderly population of the East End of London, to those who have newly arrived from Eastern Europe with potentially few or no English language skills. This coupled with the changing demographic of staff increased the potential for difficulties in conversation between patients and staff.

Using scenarios inspired by hospital situations, the programme enabled staff to understand and practice the language they need in their day to day work in a relaxed and fun atmosphere.

Read the case study to find out about the programme and the benefits to both staff and patients.

Increasing the number of patients receiving information about transition to end-of-life care

Martinsson, L. et al. (2016) BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. 6(4) pp. 452-458

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Image source: Rowena Dugdale – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Introduction: Honest prognostication and information for patients are important parts of end-of-life care. This study examined whether an educational intervention could increase the proportion of patients who received information about the transition to end-of-life (ITEOL care).

Method: Two municipalities (in charge of nursing homes) and two hospitals were randomised to receive an interactive half-day course about ITEOL for physicians and nurses. The proportion of patients who received ITEOL was measured with data from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care (SRPC). Patients were only included if they died an expected death and maintained their ability to express their will until days or hours before their death. Four hospitals and four municipalities were assigned controls, matched by hospital size, population and proportion of patients receiving ITEOL at baseline.

Results:The proportion of patients in the intervention group who received ITEOL increased from 35.1% (during a 6-month period before the intervention) to 42% (during a 6-month period after the intervention). The proportion in the control group increased from 30.4% to 33.7%. The effect of the intervention was significant (p=0.005) in a multivariable model adjusted for time, age, gender and cause of death.

Conclusion: More patients at end-of-life received ITEOL after an educative half-day intervention directed to physicians and nurses.

Read the full article here