New framework to promote person-centred approaches in healthcare

Skills for Health, Health Education England and Skills for Care have announced a new Framework to support person-centred approaches for the health and social care workforce | Skills for Health

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Image source: Skills for Health

This approach, outlined in the Five Year Forward View, puts people, families and communities at the heart of health, care and wellbeing. It encourages people to speak with staff about what is important to them, helping to develop a shared understanding of what matters to them.

The new framework, commissioned by Health Education England, helps workers communicate meaningfully both verbally and non-verbally, tailoring the care and advice they give to suit peoples’ needs. It supports individuals to better manage their own health and wellbeing through bespoke care, planning and support. Where appropriate, the framework encourages shared decision making, outlining all reasonable options and ensuring that all information is personalised, accessible and useful.

General Practice Nursing – Developing confidence, capability and capacity

This Ten Point Action Plan for General Practice Nursing, describes the nursing element of the General Practice Forward View (GPFV) | NHS England

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Image source: NHS England

The GPN ten point action plan sets out the measures required to bring about the changes that are needed, which will be taken forward by NHS England, Health Education England, NHS Improvement, Public Health England, The Royal College of Nursing, The Royal College of General Practitioners, The Queens Nursing Institute and The British Medical Association. These organisations will support commissioners and providers to implement the actions at local level. Delivery of this Ten Point Action Plan at a local level will be supported by one of four Regional GPN Delivery Boards.

General practice at scale and new care models provide fresh opportunities for supporting general practice nurses to develop skills and advance their careers. This will assist recruitment and retention which will in turn ease GPs’ workload as well as improving the experience of care for individuals, the outcomes of care and treatment, the use of NHS resources and staff experience.

Nursing associate trainee case studies

Some 2,000 nursing associates are currently in training across England. This page features case studies of trainees embarking on their nursing associate careers | HEE

Below is a video featuring Leanne Roberts, a trainee in Devon and Exeter, who talks about what she wants to get out of training to become a nursing associate.

Leanne is one of dozens of trainees that have started the exciting new training programme in hospitals and care homes across Devon.

View all the case studies here

Health Education England: annual report

Annual report and accounts for Health Education England for 2016 to 2017.

The fourth HEE Annual report  outlines the achievements over the last year: outlining
how HEE continue to help improve the quality of care for patients by focussing on and investing in the education and training of the workforce which delivers that care,
now and in the future.

This vision of higher quality care is articulated in the Five Year Forward View (5YFV), which HEE co-created and now helps deliver nationally, regionally and locally through Local Workforce Action Boards (LWABs).

LWABs are where the workforce issues of Sustainability and Transformation Plans are worked through together with HEE’s partners; making sure the right conversations happen with the right people at the right time.

Government ‘reneging on promise to fund 10,000 extra nursing places’

Scrapping nursing bursaries was supposed to expand training places – but that pledge has been quietly dropped, universities say | The Guardian

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Universities are warning that the government is quietly reneging on its promise to provide 10,000 new nursing degree places, intended to relieve pressure on the NHS.

Student nurses must spend 50% of their degree working under supervision, usually in a hospital. But universities have told Education Guardian that not a single extra nursing training place has been funded or allocated for the future. It would cost £15m over five years to fund training placements for 10,000 new nurses, according to the Council of Deans of Health, the body that represents university faculties of nursing.

Applications to study nursing in the new 2017-18 academic year have slumped by 23% compared with last year, after the abolition of bursaries. The government said last year it would free up £800m and pay for an extra 10,000 places by ending bursaries and shifting student nurses to the standard system of £9,000-a-year tuition fees supported by loans. Angry academics now say this was a hollow promise.

Read the full news story here

Women and leadership – (still) more to do

Despite the advances of recent years, two recent reports, Women in finance and Women on boards: 50:50 by 2020, once again draw attention to the problems women still face in obtaining senior leadership positions within the NHS and outside it | The King’s Fund

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Women in finance is about fairness, equality and inclusion for women and men. It is predicated on a desire for gender parity and a balanced workforce because, as the evidence makes clear, this improves culture, behaviour, outcomes, profitability and productivity. However, the current situation in the financial services sector is quite different; more women than men start out in financial services but many women fail to move up the management scale. This leaves almost all the top jobs in the hands of men. The main reason for this, it appears, is organisational culture.

One study conducted in 2016 across a wide range of employment sectors found that unsupportive workplace cultures still present the most significant barrier to career progress for women. Amazingly this was the case for female respondents in the 20-29 age group as well as for older respondents. Gender inequality and discrimination were reported, as were difficult colleagues and managers, bullying, undervalued work, and women feeling that they have to over-perform simply because they are female. Recommendations following this study included building closer relationships between men and women in the workplace, and the provision of opportunities to discuss gender issues experienced within the organisational culture.

Workplace Mindfulness Program for Public Sector Employees

Mindfulness training appears to reduce stress and distress, but little is known about whether its appropriateness as a workplace stress management intervention for a large and distributed public sector workforce.

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This study evaluated a pilot 5-week Mindfulness at Work Program (MaWP) for acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy in relation to stress and related mental health and productivity problems for public sector employees.

The intervention thus appears to have potential merit as a workplace intervention for public sector employees across a range of outcomes. Obtaining informant observations was feasible and while qualitative analyses indicated positive changes that supported self-reported outcomes, quantitative analyses returned ambiguous results. A seven-item scale adapted from a popular self-report mindfulness scale for use by informants showed promise, but further work is needed to establish validity, reliability, and scalability of this method of assessing observable changes following mindfulness training.

Full reference: Bartlett, L. et al. (2017) Acceptability, Feasibility, and Efficacy of a Workplace Mindfulness Program for Public Sector Employees: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial with Informant Reports. Mindfulness. 8(639)